Answered By: James Whitmer
Last Updated: Jun 09, 2020     Views: 2

A dependent clause is a group of words (with a subject and verb) that cannot make sense on its own because it does not express a complete thought. The reason for this is the clause begins with a subordinating conjunction (e.g. that, which, although, because, since, etc.) that requires more information from an independent clause to form a complete sentence. Below are some examples of dependent clauses:

  • if I want to pass my class
  • because I love horror movies
  • although I planned to attend the party

In contrast, an independent clause is a group of words (with a subject and verb) that can stand on its own because it expresses a complete thought. This is because it does not begin with a subordinating conjunction. Below are some examples of independent clauses:

  • I want to pass my class.
  • I love horror movies.
  • I planned to attend the party.

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